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The Musical Instruments

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One hand recorder flute

The one hand recorder is a type of flute, that you find in some folk music cultures, and it could also be found with troubadours in Middle Age Europe. The special thing with it is that it can be played with one hand, the Middle Age version was called tabor pipe and the troubadours used to play a little drum with the other hand. The flute has an ordinary "piano scale", that can be reached with only three finger holes. You use the thumb for a hole on the back side, and the index finger and the little finger for the two other holes. You hold it between the middle finger (over the pipe) and the ring finger (under the pipe), which makes it possible to play tones with all the holes open. It comes in a left hand and a right hand version.

It is made in to tunings, a C major one and a F major one. If you want, you can get the C major one in a bent version, which shortens the distance between the mouthpiece and the finger holes. This flute has 24 inches (60 cm) distance to the farthest hole in the straight version and about 22 inches (55 cm) in the bent version. The F version has that distance 18 inches (45 cm).

This is how to play the C major flute. You get the tones partly by covering the holes and partly by blowing at different strengths. In the table, the white rings mean open holes, the black dots mean covered holes

TONE

Little finger

Index finger

Thumb

Blowing strength

C

1

D

1

E

1

F

1

G

2

A

2

B

2

C

3

D

3

E

4

F

4

 

Apart from these marked tones, you can also get tones in between them through half covering the holes

As you can see, the flute is looking very much like The Stick, but it is only partly using it's technique with different blowing strengths. You can say that you fill the space between the tones in the lower register of The Stick using the finger holes, so you get a diatonic scale (corresponding to the white keys of a piano).



Letter on the one hand recorder



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